Find Job

Using Search Tips

Match all words – Returns job entries containing ALL of the keywords entered into the search string.

Match any words – Returns job entries containing ANY of the keywords entered into the search string.

Boolean Full-Text Searches– Allows a more specific search using

+ stands for AND

- stands for NOT

[no operator] implies OR


Operator
Description
+
Include, the word must be present.
-
Exclude, the word must not be present.
>
Include, and increase ranking value.
<
Include, and decrease the ranking value.
0
Group words into subexpressions (allowing them to be included, excluded, ranked, and so forth as a group).
~
Negate a word’s ranking value.
*
Wildcard at the end of the word.
""
Defines a phrase (as opposed to a list of individual words, the entire phrase is matched for inclusion or exclusion).

The following examples demonstrate some search strings that use boolean full-text operators:


Example
Description
'apple banana'
Find rows that contain at least one of the two words.
'+apple +juice'
Find rows that contain both words.
'+apple macintosh'
Find rows that contain the word “apple”, but rank rows higher if they also contain “macintosh”.
'+apple -macintosh'
Find rows that contain the word “apple” but not “macintosh”.
'+apple ~macintosh'
Find rows that contain the word “apple”, but if the row also contains the word “macintosh”, rate it lower than if row does not. This is “softer” than a search for '+apple -macintosh', for which the presence of “macintosh” causes the row not to be returned at all.
'+apple +(>turnover>strudel)'
Find rows that contain the words “apple” and “turnover”, or “apple” and “strudel” (in any order), but rank “apple turnover” higher than “apple strudel”.
'apple*'
Find rows that contain words such as “apple”, “apples”, “applesauce”, or “applet”.
'"some words"'
Find rows that contain the exact phrase “some words” (for example, rows that contain “some words of wisdom” but not “some noise words”). Note that the “"” characters that enclose the phrase are operator characters that delimit the phrase. They are not the quotation marks that enclose the search string itself.

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